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Need a quick side dish for a holiday dinner? Or any old time?
Try this cauliflower recipe. Just a few ingredients, lots of flavor. You can eat it hot or at room temperature (if you want to make it ahead).
Aleppo pepper is a hint smoky. Substitute crushed red pepper or smoked paprika instead.                                                                                                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                          Sauteed Cauliflower with Scallions, Aleppo Pepper and Mint

One head cauliflower
3 tablespoons olive oil
4 medium scallions, chopped
1 large clove garlic, chopped
1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper
salt to taste
3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

Wash and trim the cauliflower and cut it into bite size pieces. Place the pieces into a saucepan, add 1 cup water and bring to a boil over high heat. Cover the pan and cook the pieces for 3-5 minutes or until barely tender. Drain and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add the cauliflower pieces, scallion and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, for 3-4 minutes or until well browned. Sprinkle with Aleppo pepper and salt, toss the ingredients for 30 seconds or so, then  place the contents of the pan into a serving dish. Sprinkle with mint and serve.

Makes 4 servings

Need a quick side dish for a holiday dinner? Or any old time?

Try this cauliflower recipe. Just a few ingredients, lots of flavor. You can eat it hot or at room temperature (if you want to make it ahead).

Aleppo pepper is a hint smoky. Substitute crushed red pepper or smoked paprika instead.                                                                                                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                          Sauteed Cauliflower with Scallions, Aleppo Pepper and Mint

One head cauliflower

3 tablespoons olive oil

4 medium scallions, chopped

1 large clove garlic, chopped

1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper

salt to taste

3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

Wash and trim the cauliflower and cut it into bite size pieces. Place the pieces into a saucepan, add 1 cup water and bring to a boil over high heat. Cover the pan and cook the pieces for 3-5 minutes or until barely tender. Drain and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add the cauliflower pieces, scallion and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, for 3-4 minutes or until well browned. Sprinkle with Aleppo pepper and salt, toss the ingredients for 30 seconds or so, then  place the contents of the pan into a serving dish. Sprinkle with mint and serve.

Makes 4 servings

It wouldn’t be the Jewish High Holiday season if you didn’t see at least one recipe for Plum Torte. 
I suppose it’s because the holidays come at around the same time as the harvest for those small, dark purple Italian prune plums and what could be better than dessert made with the newest, freshest, soon-to-disappear seasonal fruit? (Although the torte recipe is so versatile that my niece Rachel Vail, renowned children’s book author, once made it with pears.)
I’ve made several versions over the years, including the NYTimes recipe and my Aunt Beck’s famous apple cake made with plums.
This year I’m baking a new variation for the holidays. If Plum Torte is so delicious, can’t it be even better — and lovelier looking — with a streusel top?
Yes!
Here it is:

Plum Cake with Oat Streusel
 
Cake:
 
Streusel (recipe below)
1/2 cup butter, melted and cooled
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons grated fresh orange peel
2 large eggs
1 cup milk
12 Italian prune plums, pitted and sliced
 
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Make the streusel and set it aside. Lightly grease a 9-inch springform pan. Melt the butter and set it aside to cool. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and orange peel in the bowl of an electric mixer. In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk and melted butter. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ones and beat for about one minute, until smooth. Turn the batter into the prepared cake pan. Top with the plum slices. Cover with the streusel. Bake for about 45 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 15 minutes. Remove the outer ring from the pan and let the cake cool completely. 
Makes one cake serving 8 people
 
 Streusel
 
1/2 cup rolled oats

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup packed light brown sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
 
Mix the oats, flour, brown sugar and salt in a bowl. Add the butter and work it into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Set aside.

 

It wouldn’t be the Jewish High Holiday season if you didn’t see at least one recipe for Plum Torte.

I suppose it’s because the holidays come at around the same time as the harvest for those small, dark purple Italian prune plums and what could be better than dessert made with the newest, freshest, soon-to-disappear seasonal fruit? (Although the torte recipe is so versatile that my niece Rachel Vail, renowned children’s book author, once made it with pears.)

I’ve made several versions over the years, including the NYTimes recipe and my Aunt Beck’s famous apple cake made with plums.

This year I’m baking a new variation for the holidays. If Plum Torte is so delicious, can’t it be even better — and lovelier looking — with a streusel top?

Yes!

Here it is:

Plum Cake with Oat Streusel

 

Cake:

 

Streusel (recipe below)

1/2 cup butter, melted and cooled

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons grated fresh orange peel

2 large eggs

1 cup milk

12 Italian prune plums, pitted and sliced

 

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Make the streusel and set it aside. Lightly grease a 9-inch springform pan. Melt the butter and set it aside to cool. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and orange peel in the bowl of an electric mixer. In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk and melted butter. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ones and beat for about one minute, until smooth. Turn the batter into the prepared cake pan. Top with the plum slices. Cover with the streusel. Bake for about 45 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 15 minutes. Remove the outer ring from the pan and let the cake cool completely.

Makes one cake serving 8 people

 


Streusel

 

1/2 cup rolled oats


1/3 cup all-purpose flour


1/2 cup packed light brown sugar


1/8 teaspoon salt

4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

 

Mix the oats, flour, brown sugar and salt in a bowl. Add the butter and work it into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs. Set aside.

 

Some people think chicken is boring and unexciting, but I disagree, especially when it comes to a whole roasted chicken.
To me, a large roasted chicken coming out of the oven, crispy-skinned and glistening, fragrant with the aromas of a happy family dinner, is so impressive, so festive, that I always serve it during the Jewish High Holidays. 
And can I tell you the other benefits?
Chicken is extraordinarily versatile. You can season it so many ways that you will never run out of ideas. Spice it with Baharat or sprinkle it with fresh chopped rosemary. Or just salt and pepper. Drizzle it with Balsamic vinegar and a bit of orange peel. Baste it with orange juice or wine or chicken stock. Give it some heat with jalapeno peppers or harissa or make it sweet and mild by cooking it with apples and honey.
I could go on, except I need to tell you that making roasted chicken is EASY.
Here’s the proof:      

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Roasted Chicken
 
1 roasting chicken, 5-6 pounds
1 tablespoon olive oil 
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
garlic powder and paprika, optional
ras el hanout, baharat, garam masala, harissa, chopped fresh herbs to taste, optional
1 to 1-1/2 cups chicken stock, white wine or juice
 
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Remove any pinfeathers and extra flesh and fat from the chicken. Take out the package of giblets inside the cavity (you may save these pieces for stock, except for the liver, or roast them along with the chicken). Brush the olive oil all over the chicken. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and optional seasonings. Place the chicken breast side down on a rack placed inside a roasting pan. Roast for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven heat to 350 degrees. Roast the chicken for 15 minutes. Pour the stock (wine or juice) over the chicken and roast for another 15 minutes. Turn the chicken breast side up. Roast the chicken, basting occasionally, for 45-60 minutes, depending on the size of the chicken, or until the chicken is cooked through (a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the breast registers 160 degrees or 165 degrees in the thickest part of the thigh). Remove the chicken to a carving board and let rest for 15 minutes before carving. Serve with pan juices (you may strain the pan fluids if desired, and/or reduce them to desired thickness by boiling the fluids in a small saucepan over high heat). 
Makes 6 servings 

 

Some people think chicken is boring and unexciting, but I disagree, especially when it comes to a whole roasted chicken.

To me, a large roasted chicken coming out of the oven, crispy-skinned and glistening, fragrant with the aromas of a happy family dinner, is so impressive, so festive, that I always serve it during the Jewish High Holidays. 

And can I tell you the other benefits?

Chicken is extraordinarily versatile. You can season it so many ways that you will never run out of ideas. Spice it with Baharat or sprinkle it with fresh chopped rosemary. Or just salt and pepper. Drizzle it with Balsamic vinegar and a bit of orange peel. Baste it with orange juice or wine or chicken stock. Give it some heat with jalapeno peppers or harissa or make it sweet and mild by cooking it with apples and honey.

I could go on, except I need to tell you that making roasted chicken is EASY.

Here’s the proof:      

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Roasted Chicken

 

1 roasting chicken, 5-6 pounds

1 tablespoon olive oil 

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

garlic powder and paprika, optional

ras el hanout, baharat, garam masala, harissa, chopped fresh herbs to taste, optional

1 to 1-1/2 cups chicken stock, white wine or juice

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Remove any pinfeathers and extra flesh and fat from the chicken. Take out the package of giblets inside the cavity (you may save these pieces for stock, except for the liver, or roast them along with the chicken). Brush the olive oil all over the chicken. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and optional seasonings. Place the chicken breast side down on a rack placed inside a roasting pan. Roast for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven heat to 350 degrees. Roast the chicken for 15 minutes. Pour the stock (wine or juice) over the chicken and roast for another 15 minutes. Turn the chicken breast side up. Roast the chicken, basting occasionally, for 45-60 minutes, depending on the size of the chicken, or until the chicken is cooked through (a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the breast registers 160 degrees or 165 degrees in the thickest part of the thigh). Remove the chicken to a carving board and let rest for 15 minutes before carving. Serve with pan juices (you may strain the pan fluids if desired, and/or reduce them to desired thickness by boiling the fluids in a small saucepan over high heat).

Makes 6 servings