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It is colder in Connecticut today than it was when I was in Antarctica a few years ago. So I decided that before I venture out today, I would put on the silk long johns and tee shirts I bought when Ed and I took an adventure trip to that place at the cold, cold bottom of the world.
And think warm thoughts.
Like reading about Tu B’Shevat, a little known Jewish holiday that celebrates the budding of the first trees in Israel. The emergence of signs of spring.
What a lovely thought. 
On Tu B’Shevat (this year on January 26th) it is customary to eat fruit, an acknowledgment of earth’s bounty.
Like Baked Apples. Not just good to eat. They also warm up the kitchen and make your house smell divine.

Baked Apples
6 baking apples
half a lemon
3 tablespoons raisins or chopped dates
3 tablespoons dried cranberries or cherries
2 tablespoons finely chopped almonds or hazelnuts
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 cup honey
1 cup orange or apple juice
1 tablespoon butter or coconut oil
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Wash the apples and remove the core with an apple corer or small knife, leaving about 1/2” on the bottom. Peel the apples halfway down from the top and rub the peeled surfaces with the cut side of the lemon. Put the apples in a baking dish. Mix the raisins, cranberries, nuts, cinnamon, ginger and honey. Stuff this mixture into the apple hollows. Pour the juice over the apples. Dot the tops with butter or coconut oil. Bake for 45 minutes, basting occasionally with the pan juices, or until the apples are tender. Serve warm or at room temperature. Makes 6 servings

It is colder in Connecticut today than it was when I was in Antarctica a few years ago. So I decided that before I venture out today, I would put on the silk long johns and tee shirts I bought when Ed and I took an adventure trip to that place at the cold, cold bottom of the world.

And think warm thoughts.

Like reading about Tu B’Shevat, a little known Jewish holiday that celebrates the budding of the first trees in Israel. The emergence of signs of spring.

What a lovely thought. 

On Tu B’Shevat (this year on January 26th) it is customary to eat fruit, an acknowledgment of earth’s bounty.

Like Baked Apples. Not just good to eat. They also warm up the kitchen and make your house smell divine.


Baked Apples

6 baking apples

half a lemon

3 tablespoons raisins or chopped dates

3 tablespoons dried cranberries or cherries

2 tablespoons finely chopped almonds or hazelnuts

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 cup honey

1 cup orange or apple juice

1 tablespoon butter or coconut oil

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Wash the apples and remove the core with an apple corer or small knife, leaving about 1/2” on the bottom. Peel the apples halfway down from the top and rub the peeled surfaces with the cut side of the lemon. Put the apples in a baking dish. Mix the raisins, cranberries, nuts, cinnamon, ginger and honey. Stuff this mixture into the apple hollows. Pour the juice over the apples. Dot the tops with butter or coconut oil. Bake for 45 minutes, basting occasionally with the pan juices, or until the apples are tender. Serve warm or at room temperature. Makes 6 servings

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